utnereader:

Why is Bioremediation Scarce in Urban Gardens?
For a number of years now, urban gardeners and their supporting organizations have been aware of the concept of bioremediation. Bioremediation’s use of naturally occurring organisms, apparent affordability and minimal disturbance to soils all add to its attractiveness. The idea of partnering with life-forms such as bacteria, plants, worms and fungi (all of whom gardeners are already familiar with) greatly adds to its appeal. Numerous scientific studies have been conducted that support bioremediation’s effectiveness — there’s no question that given the right circumstances, these organisms have the potential to degrade, immobilize or sequester a variety of contaminants. Bioremediation would appear to be an ideal and elegant solution to issues of soil toxicity. Why then, have bioremediation techniques not yet been put into use broadly as a means to remediate contaminated soils in urban gardens? Keep reading.

This author will be giving a talk at the University of Toronto in conjunction with the campus agriculture group I work for called Dig in! I am super excited to learn from her. 

utnereader:

Why is Bioremediation Scarce in Urban Gardens?

For a number of years now, urban gardeners and their supporting organizations have been aware of the concept of bioremediation. Bioremediation’s use of naturally occurring organisms, apparent affordability and minimal disturbance to soils all add to its attractiveness. The idea of partnering with life-forms such as bacteria, plants, worms and fungi (all of whom gardeners are already familiar with) greatly adds to its appeal. Numerous scientific studies have been conducted that support bioremediation’s effectiveness — there’s no question that given the right circumstances, these organisms have the potential to degrade, immobilize or sequester a variety of contaminants. Bioremediation would appear to be an ideal and elegant solution to issues of soil toxicity. Why then, have bioremediation techniques not yet been put into use broadly as a means to remediate contaminated soils in urban gardens? Keep reading.

This author will be giving a talk at the University of Toronto in conjunction with the campus agriculture group I work for called Dig in! I am super excited to learn from her. 

Finally got some red wigglers to start my first vermacomposter! I got their bed ready and have them some  food. I haven’t tried to take a picture of them yet because I’m letting them settle in. I’m so exited for this project. It’s something I’ve been wanting to do for a while!
Zoom Info
Finally got some red wigglers to start my first vermacomposter! I got their bed ready and have them some  food. I haven’t tried to take a picture of them yet because I’m letting them settle in. I’m so exited for this project. It’s something I’ve been wanting to do for a while!
Zoom Info
Finally got some red wigglers to start my first vermacomposter! I got their bed ready and have them some  food. I haven’t tried to take a picture of them yet because I’m letting them settle in. I’m so exited for this project. It’s something I’ve been wanting to do for a while!
Zoom Info

Finally got some red wigglers to start my first vermacomposter! I got their bed ready and have them some food. I haven’t tried to take a picture of them yet because I’m letting them settle in. I’m so exited for this project. It’s something I’ve been wanting to do for a while!

Some green salad bowl lettuce and arugula I helped to plant and harvest is being sold at the co-op cafe in this weeks menu.

Some green salad bowl lettuce and arugula I helped to plant and harvest is being sold at the co-op cafe in this weeks menu.